Author Archive: Ida Allen

Top 3 NHL Coaches of All Time

The National Hockey League or NHL for short is the world’s premier hockey league. While it is the players that tend to get the most attention, some highly skilled coaches deserve their own accolades for the achievements they made in coaching the teams they coached for.

We thought it might be nice to highlight three of the best in the game who have retired or passed away. Their achievements are well deserving of pen to paper per say. We hope you agree!

1. Scotty Bowman

Scotty Bowman had 1,244 wins in his coaching career and is one of the most celebrated. This is the most out of any who have coached in the big leagues and is impressive, to say the least. Bowman began his coaching career with the St. Louis Blues and remained there for four years. After leaving St. Louis, Bowman made his way to Montreal to coach the Canadiens for eight years. A successful run that saw Bowman winning the Stanley Cup five times.

After leaving Montreal, Bowman found himself in Buffalo with the Sabres and in his five years with the team, failed to win the Stanley Cup and was fired from his coaching duties. Bowman then moved to Hockey Night in Canada where he was an analyst before returning to the bench with the Penguins for two seasons where he coached the Penguins to the Stanley Cup in his first year. After his second season, Bowman moved onto to Detroit Red Wings and remained there for a record nine seasons. In those nine seasons, Bowman and the Detroit team won the Stanley Cup three times before Bowman retired in 2002.

2. Joel Quenneville

Joel Quenneville has amassed 783 wins in his NHL career as a coach. Quenneville got his start with the St Louis Blues in 1996 and made it to the playoffs in each of the seven years he was coaching the team. His success with the Blues saw him making it to one conference final and winning the Presidents’ Trophy. After failing to win a Stanley Cup for the team he was let go, and in 2005 he returned to the Colorado Avalanche, a team he was an assistant coach with before accepting the head coach position with the Blues.

Quenneville remained with the Avalanche for three seasons before moving onto the Chicago Blackhawks where he coached the team to their first Stanley Cup trophy in almost 50 years. Since their first win, Quenneville and the Blackhawks have gone on to win the Stanley Cup two more times, once in 2013 and again in 2015. He is considered one of the best coaches in the league today.

3. Al Arbour

However, not all was lost for Arbour as he found himself with the New York Islanders and this is where he shined. While he failed to make it to the playoffs in the first year as head coach, they did every year thereafter while he was head coach. Arbour coached the Islanders to four consecutive Stanley Cup wins during the 80’s before he moved onto the Edmonton Oilers. Arbour remained with the Canadian team until 1986, returning for another six years in 1989 where he coached the team to the playoffs not once, but three times. Arbour had a total of 782 career wins,

However, not all was lost for Arbour as he found himself with the New York Islanders and this is where he shined. While he failed to make it to the playoffs in the first year as head coach, they did every year thereafter while he was head coach. Arbour coached the Islanders to four consecutive Stanley Cup wins during the 80’s before he moved onto the Edmonton Oilers. Arbour remained with the Canadian team until 1986, returning for another six years in 1989 where he coached the team to the playoffs not once, but three times. Arbour had a total of 782 career wins,

However, not all was lost for Arbour as he found himself with the New York Islanders and this is where he shined. While he failed to make it to the playoffs in the first year as head coach, but they did every year after that while he was head coach. Arbour coached the Islanders to four consecutive Stanley Cup wins during the 80’s before he moved onto the Edmonton Oilers. Arbour remained with the Canadian team until 1986, returning for another six years in 1989 where he coached the team to the playoffs not once, but three times. Arbour had a total of 782 career wins.

How to become a Football Coach

Do you wabt to learn how to become a Football Coach?If you want to end up as the Barcelona manager, the chances are that you’re going to have to do it via a simulator, like the popular Championship Manager/Football Manager franchises. However, almost everybody involved with football, either at a club or international level must start at the bottom and work their way up. You might not end up the England manager, but you could still carve out a pretty respectable career in coaching. How? Take your badges and learn to coach.

Level Certificates in Coaching Football

In the English Football League (EFL) system, the coaches and managers are taught extensively everything they need to know. There are three main strands of coaching that players can choose to take. The first (the most ambitious) leads directly to a UEFA Pro License, something that everybody with lofty ambitions and aspirations is going to have to do if they want to make it in the top flights across the world. The second permits you to coach in goalkeeping, Futsal or disabled football. The final strand allows you to work with youths, as a youth team coach. Which strand you take is entirely up to you.

The first step, though, is to take the Level One Certificate in Coaching Football course. It offers coaching sessions for you, and teaches you how to run drills, developer technical skills and is ideally suited to coaches who wish to teach young players.

Passing that step takes you to Level Two, where you can learn in-depth coaching styles. These prepare you for emergencies, player’s nutritional requirements and accidents. This “health and fitness” side of the course is required if you want to be a top coach.

Lastly, Level Three sees you learn performance profiling. You will discover how to evaluate players and team performance, how to set goals, analyses matches, asses psychological, mental and physical fitness.

The UEFA Pro License

Of course, if you wish to take the top jobs in football, you need a UEFA Pro License. To start off with, you need to go through the UEFA B License program. Only after passing this introductory course can you step up to the UEFA A License, which is required by all the top teams, and is the highest coaching badge you can earn. Here, at least 120 hours of coaching are required, especially with an 11-a-side team, and you’ll learn the finer, more intricate aspects of coaching. Once the UEFA A License program has been completed, coaches will be given an FA Academy Managers license (for use in the English league and youth coaching) and/or the UEFA Pro License, which is a serious qualification that makes clubs sit up and take notice of you.

Most young coaches will still have to pay their dues at smaller clubs first, but once you’ve got a UEFA Pro License under your belt, it is likely that you’ll climb the ladder quicker than most; even if you don’t end up at the Real Madrid, Manchester United or Bayern Munich.