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Coaching Resilience and How to Improve It

Resilience is as essential in life as it is on the sports field. Sometimes things don’t work out as planned, and then when life hits hard, you still need to have the resilience to stand up and fight back. This is a common scenario during any sports event. When one competitor or team is having an overhand above another, the ability to get up in the face of possible defeat is a skill which comes naturally for some and needs to be coached to others. Following are some advice from Olympic Gold medallists on how you can coach your athletes into being resilient in the face of defeat.

Personal Development is Key

It is essential to instil the concept with your athletes that it is vital that they compare their performance against their own. Comparing your achievement with those of others can be an unnecessary cause of strain and anxiety. These can hinder athletes from delivering their best results. In the end, it is about competing against yourself, improving your skills, techniques and performance and developing yourself into the athlete you want to be. As a coach, you want to do the same and compare an athlete’s performance only against their own and not that of others.

Handle Setback as Opportunities to Create Growth

Setbacks will happen. It is needed to happen. Without delays, you will have no reason to improve. It can be easy if delays are a regular occurrence, to get stuck in a negative place of being mentally defeated. Every setback can be analysed and be transformed as a learning curve. It is your responsibility as a coach to set the example of this during team talks.

Know Why You Want to Win

Determination is built from a clear vantage point on the end desire. The better your understanding is of why you want to win, the more attractive winning seems, and the higher the desire to win grows. As a coach, you must ensure that your team is convinced of why they want to win. They need to be able to experience a personal hunger and desire for achieving success to get up from a wrong position and march forward to be triumphant.

Creating Positivity

Sometimes a coach can find himself in a place of misery, stuck with a team who are not motivated at all. Every practice session is experienced as some form of obligatory punishment, and the entire course is riddled with negativity. A coach needs to be clear on the fact that coaching this team has been a choice made. This isn’t an obligation, and you had an opportunity to be here or not. The same goes for your athletes. They must remember that they chose to do their best and to deliver their best efforts. Always keeping in mind that what you are doing has been a choice that gives an improved sense of control over your life. This leads to a much more positive and productive outcome in the end.

Women Coaching in NBA

Over time female coaches in the NBA became a more familiar face in a male-dominated world. A few women have, however, shown their value by contributing to their teams and leading them to greatness. We will explore some of these women who were the first to break through the male-dominated barriers.

Nancy Lieberman

The first woman to set a new trend when hired in 2009 as head coach of NBA Development Team, Texas Legends. Currently, Lieberman also called “Lady Magic” is an assistant coach to the Sacramento Kings and she is a head coach to the BIG3’s Power, leading them to a 2018 BIG3 Championship. Coming from a career as a professional basketball player and from a coaching position in the Women’s National Basketball Association, she is considered one of the most significant contributors to women’s basketball in history. When she was hired in 2009 as a coach for the Texas Legends, she was the first female coach ever hired to coach a male team on NBA level. When she became the assistant coach for the Sacramento Kings, she was the second female assistant coach ever contracted.

Natalie Nakase

2018 was the year to see a female coach hired for the LA Clippers. This is not the first milestone for her. During her playing career, she played two NWBL seasons. First for the San Jose Spiders followed by the San Diego Siege. She was the first-ever Asian-American player in the league.

Nicki Gross

Becoming the first woman coaching in D-League when hired by Iowa Energy, another NBA Development League. Currently employed by the Raptors 905 as an assistant coach and still the only female coach in D-League. Gross was a soccer player for Seton Hall and mostly a basketball fan who started as an Assistant Video Coordinator at Bakersfield Jam.

Becky Hammon

This retired Russian-American professional basketball player is the assistant coach to the San Antonio Spurs. During her playing career, she represented to San Antonio Stars and New York Liberty. She also played for the Russian National Team during the Olympics of 2008 and 2012. When the Spurs hired Hammon in 2014 as an assistant coach, she became the first full-time female assistant coach in the entire history of the NBA. This record stretched even further than the NBA since this position made Hammon the first female assistant coach in any of the four North American major professional leagues. When she was hired than in 2015 as head coach for the Spurs during their Summer League, she became the first-ever female head coach.

Jenny Boucek

Hired in 2017 by Sacramento Kings as an assistant coach and then moving to Dallas Maverick also an assistant coach in 2018. She was also the first-ever pregnant female coach, as she became a mother during the Maverick’s 2018-19 season. Thus showing that not even pregnancy would hold back a woman if she is set on achieving her goals and making her mark within a predominantly masculine industry.

The Greatest Challenges High School Coaches Face

Being the coach to a school sports team can be an immensely rewarding experience. Being involved in influencing young lives, driving them to excel on the field and off it, to achieve greatness and to inspire them to seek success. There are a few challenges in the lives of high school coaches, which is distorting the romantic idea of sculpting young minds into perfection.

Parents

Sadly, but birth parents are often a tremendous challenge in the lives of high school sports coaches. The personal investment of parents with their children and their sporting careers can often lead to conflicting ideas regarding a coach’s approach to the game plan or their child’s abilities. Some parents can quickly revert to anger towards the coach if they consider the amount of game time given to their child isn’t according to their perceived ideas of their child’s abilities. Parents can add tremendously to a team’s morale, or they can be a destructing force making the coach’s life a misery.

The Player’s Attitudes

Dealing with high school students is synonymous with dealing with a variety of different attitudes. Some not as pleasant as others. Your best player may make it a habit to show up late for practice bringing down the entire team’s sense of punctuality. Some may consider it their right to play certain positions and others may make a big deal if they are reprimanded. Conflict can rise to a level where the team becomes thoroughly divided. Therefore handling attitudes successfully and productively will always remain on the list of challenges in the high school coach’s guidebook.

Budgets Can Choke Your Success

Every school has a budget available for sports and sports facilities. This is, however, only a section of the budget of extracurricular facilities and every department head wants their share of the budget pie. To be able to deliver a proper practice session, proper equipment is needed, and this costs money. Coaches are also often confronted with extra expenses which need to be covered. Uniforms are expensive and so is going on a tour. Parents aren’t always keen on paying the extra buck, and therefore coaches are ever faced with finding creative yet lucrative ideas to fill the gaps where budget fall short from realizing a dream of a great sporting team.

Personalities Will Clash

Being a coach doesn’t only mean that you have to deal with every very unique personality in your team, you also need to deal with parents, other coaches, sponsors, department heads and many more. Conflicting personalities are bound to cross your path, and you need to be able to restore harmony when this occurs to be able to achieve the set goals and staying true to the team.

A Demanding Position

With all of these challenges which coaches needs to face, it can become a very time consuming and emotionally demanding position to be in. Often losing out on personal time with family over weekends and evenings. You need to manage this to remain in a place of having a balanced life.

The Five Highest Paid Coaches in the World

The amount of wealth of famous sports heroes is no secret to the public. Compared to them, their coaches are earning only a percentage of what they do, yet their earning are nothing to frown about. Let’s explore the five highest paid coaches in the world. Not really coming as any surprise, they all have the name of a soccer club behind their names.

Diego Simeone

Number one on the list as the highest paid coach in the world, Simeone is standing on 44.5 million euros. Simeone or Cholo as his coach nicknamed him at the age of 14 due to the energy in his play which reminded coach Victorio Spinetto to the same style which Carmelo Simeone (no relation at all) displayed. He had a successful career playing for the Argentinian National team until 2002 as well as for various clubs including Atlético Madrid, the same club which he has been managing since 2011. During the 1998 World Cup against England, Simeone simulated an injury from a kick by England’s David Beckham to get Beckham sent off the field. This is the result of a healthy ever existing rivalry between Argentina and England.

José Mourinho

This Portuguese professional coach is second in the ranks of the highest paid coaches with 31 million euros. He used to coach Manchester United until being sacked by them at the end of 2018 after an incident between him and Marco Ianni, a Chelsea coach. It occurred after Chelsea scored a goal and Ianni was in Mourinho’s face showing off their goal. This led to Mourinho retaliating and chasing Ianni into the tunnel where security had to resolve the matter. The Chelsea crowds were displeased although Mourinho brought them success before moving to Man United.

Thierry Henry

25.5 million euros bring Henry into third place. The French man was recently relieved from his duties as manager of the Ligue 1 club, Monaco. He has a long history with Monaco making his debut there in 1994. Henry is considered as one of the world best strikers ever. In both 2003 and 2004 during the FIFA World Player of the Year Awards, he made it to the runner-up.

Pep Guardiola

Guardiola has been in his position at Manchester City since 2016, and 24.1 million euros leaves him fourth on the list. During his playing career, this Spaniard played for Spain and Catalonia, and since he started his career as team manager, he was employed by Barcelona and Bayern Munich before Manchester City.

Ernesto Valverde

During his playing career, the Spaniard played in the position of forward. Currently, he is the manager of Barcelona since 2017 and is ranked fifth on the list at 23 million euros. During his playing career, he played once for the national team of Spain and spent a mere 20 minutes in the game. This was during a UEFA Euro 1992 qualifier against Iceland. Spain won 2-1.

The Most Popular Traits of Any Great Coach

Being a great coach is asking more than just knowing the game inside out, more than having an eye for talent, skill and little ability. It also requires the expertise to take several individuals and to turn them into a powerful force, a team of players working as one. It takes a massive amount of people skills and the ability to bring out the best of each member to the benefit of the team. It takes some special skills and traits. Here are some of the characteristics which are vital for any coach from school levels up to professional coaching.

Communication

Communication on various levels is vital to express your vision, but also to help team members to communicate with each other successfully. When a coach reveals the idea for the team, it should be done in a manner where mutual respect is displayed, where it is clear that the team’s success depends on every single member of the team. Regardless of whether it is a pre-game speech or during training, the vision should be communicated with mutual respect. The coach is in many ways also a personal coach, sometimes needed to assist with a lack of communication skills between team members. Any great coach knows that conflict between team members divides the attention from the ultimate goal and vision.

Leadership

Whether it is on the court or off, the coach is the leader of the team, the respected person, who is leading the team and who has the abilities to lead with respect gained. The coach is also available for advice off the court. When team members are struggling with personal matters and the coach is sought for guidance and advice, then the respect gained is returned on the court. A great coach knows that anything that distracts a player’s attention from the game should be attended to realize the team vision.

Flexibility

Some days the team is up and sometimes there are down. As a coach, you are always working with the inconsistency of humanity. Being flexible and still bringing the best out of the day is an essential characteristic of any great coach. Changes are sometimes made, injuries happen, and the coach needs to not only adapt but also assist the rest of the team to adjust as well.

Magnificent Teachers

Great coaches never stop teaching. They teach life lessons, lessons of perseverance, of overcoming hardships, of performing the best in the game and of greatness in life. Coaches can only do this if they have a passion for what they do, loving the sport and the people playing the sport. Coaching is not something you do; it is who you are, the core of your being.

Hard work

Great coaches are always busy, working, performing, improving and inspiring. A great coach doesn’t get up and go to their job, their job is who they are, and they are never done working on improving it.

Coaching Staff of the NHL’s Dallas Stars

The Dallas Stars didn’t have a horrible season during the 2018/19 NHL regular season. The team played a total of 82 games and won a total of 42 matches with only 32 losses in the Western Conference. You cannot deny that the National Hockey League is a harsh environment, not only for the players but the coaching staff as well. It’s for this very reason that we decided to take a closer look at the coaching staff behind the Dallas Stars hockey team to see who is calling the shots from behind the scenes.

Head Coach – Jim Montgomery

Jim Montgomery became the head coach of the Dallas Stars on 4 May 2018 and is regarded as the 23rd head coach in the history of the franchise and the 8th in the history of the Dallas Stars. Montgomery previously spent five years as the head coach for the men’s hockey team in the University of Denver. He impressed with a 125-57-26 record and was considered the second-winningest head coach during his time in college hockey.

Assistant Coach – Stu Barnes

Stu Barnes decided to re-join the Dallas Stars as an assistant coach during the 2017/18 season, staying in the same position he previously held with the Stars for three seasons from 2008 until 2011. He also spent 16 years as an NHL player, accumulating 597 points in 1,136 regular-season matches with Dallas, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Florida, and Winnipeg.

Assistant Coach – Rick Bowness

Rich Bowness decided to join the Dallas Stars as an assistant coach during the 2018/19 season, bringing with him more than 30 years of valuable coaching experience. Bowness has spent the last five years with Tampa Bay Lightning where he took the role of the associate coach for the team. During his time at Tampa Bay, the team impressed with a 238-135-37 record and appeared in the Stanley Cup playoffs four times.

Assistant Coach – Todd Nelson

Todd Nelson joined the Dallas Stars during the 2018/19 season. He previously spent three years with the Grand Rapids Griffins in the AHL where he was the head coach from 2015 until 2018.

Goaltending Coach – Jeff Reese

Jeff Reese will enter his 3rd season with the Dallas Stars as their goaltending coach. He initially joined the team during 2015 after he spent the last six seasons with the Philadelphia Flyers in the same role. Before he joined the Flyers, Reese spent a total of 10 seasons with the coaching staff of the Tamp Bay Lightning team where he was in control of the goaltenders. He was also an assistant when it came to amateur goaltenders in the Entry Draft of the NHL.

Video Coach – Kelly Forbes

Kelly Forbes will enter his 9th season with the Dallas Stars as video coach. Kelly works exceptionally closely with the players and coaching staff, breaking down film in post-game and in-game. He is also in charge of video scouting reports of other teams when it comes to game preparation.

The Coaching Staff of the Liverpool Football Club

While the captain of the Liverpool ship is undoubtedly Jurgen Klopp, there are loads of other noteworthy helpers on the boat to sail the Reds to glory. With the recent Champions League victory, and finishing second in the Premier League, we decided to take a look at all the coaching staff at Jurgen Klopp’s disposal. He has managed to build a phenomenal team to ensure that the playing squad remains prepared and focused for the upcoming season that starts in August 2019.

Assistant Manager – Peter Krawietz

Peter Krawietz decided to follow Jurgen Klopp to Liverpool in October 2015 from Borussia Dortmund. He initially worked with the Liverpool manager back in Mainz when Jurgen was the head coach, while he was the chief scout. The German, who is not considered a professional footballer by any means, was dubbed “The Eye” due to his phenomenal video analysis and scouting abilities.

Assistant Manager – Pep Lijnders

Jurgen Klopp didn’t think twice when he had the opportunity to bring back Pep Lijnders to Liverpool in June 2018, where he briefly left the club to return to his homeland where he was in control of NEC Nijmegen. Lijnders previously spent more than three years with Liverpool, first as a coach for the under-16’s and then the first-team development coach during 2015. Since Klopp arrived, Lijnders managed to climb even further where he is now a vital part of the team as an assistant coach.

Goalkeeping Coach – John Achterberg

Achterberg is another Dutchman in the coaching staff for Liverpool that joined in June 2009 after he spent more than a decade with Tranmere Rovers. He was initially a player with the team before he moved to a coaching position. Achterberg received his promotion to goalkeeping coach in 2011 and has coached Liverpool’s goalkeepers ever since.

Head of Conditioning and Fitness – Andreas Kornmayer

Kornmayer decided to join The Reds in July 2016 after he spent more than 15 years with the dominant Bayern Munich team. Given Liverpool’s reliance on energy, tremendous importance is placed on the ability and skill of Kornmayer, who much impressed Klopp during his time spent at Bayern Munich where he worked under Pep Guardiola, Jupp Heynckes, and Louis van Gaal.

Head of Medical Services – Dr Andrew Massey

Dr Massey was initially a professional football player in an Irish League before an injury forced him to enrol in a university where he studied physiotherapy. After his studies in medicine and sports physiotherapy, Dr Massey joined the ice hockey team, Belfast Giants, before he was promoted as team doctor. In 2013, he was appointed the academy doctor for Liverpool and was made permanent in 2015.

Performance and Rehabilitation Manager – Philipp Jacobsen

The newest recruit in the Liverpool coaching staff is Philipp Jacobsen that works closely with Dr Massey. Jacobsen was initially a senior physiotherapist in Qatar before he made his way to the Liverpool squad. He also worked with the national team of Qatar, where he gained most of his experience.

The Best Managers of All Time in Football

A world-renowned football magazine has recently published a list of the best football managers in the history of the sport. The criteria’s that were used to compile this list included trophies won during their coaching careers as well as how the coach influenced the competition and other managers. Below, you will find a list of the best football managers to ever coach the sport.

Rinus Michels: Netherlands

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x EUFA European Championship, 1 x European Cup, 1 x La Liga Championship, 4 x Eredivisie Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Netherlands national team, FC Barcelona, Ajax
  • Years Active: 1960 – 1992

Sir Alex Ferguson

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 2 x European Cup Winners Cup, 13 x Premier Leagues, 3 x Scottish Division Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 58.1%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Manchester United
  • Years Active: 1974 – 2013

Arrigo Sacchi: Italy

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 1 x Serie A Championship
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Italy national soccer team, AC Milan
  • Years Active: 1985 – 2001

Johan Cruyff: Netherlands

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x UEFA Champions League, 4 x La Liga Championships
  • Win Percentage Overall: 61.3%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: FC Barcelona, Ajax
  • Years Active: 1985 – 2013

Pep Guardiola: Spain

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 2 x Premier Leagues, 3 x Bundesliga Championships, 3 x La Liga Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 72.5%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Manchester City, Bayern Munich, FC Barcelona
  • Years Active: 2008 – Present

Valeriy Lobanovskyi: Ukraine

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x EUFA Cup Winners Cups, 5 x Ukraine National League Championships, 8 x Soviet Top League Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Dynamo Kyiv
  • Years Active: 1969 – 2001

Helenio Herrera: France/Argentina

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x EUFA Champions Leagues, 2 x Serie A Championships, 4 x La Liga Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Inter Milan, FC Barcelona, Atletico Madrid
  • Years Active: 1944 – 1981

Carlo Ancelotti: Italy

  • Major Titles Claimed: 3 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 1 x Bundesliga Championship, 1 x Ligue 1 Championship, 1 x Premier League, 1 x Serie A Championship
  • Win Percentage Overall: 59%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Bayern Munich, Real Madrid, Chelsea, AC Milan, Juventus
  • Years Active: 1995 – Present

Ernst Happel: Austria

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 2 x Austrian Championships, 2 x Bundesliga Championships, 1 x Eredivisie Championship.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 55%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Hamburg, Netherlands national team, Club Brugge.
  • Years Active: 1962 – 1992

Bill Shankly: Scotland

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x EUFA Champions League, 2 x Premier League Titles.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 49.3%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Liverpool
  • Years Active: 1949 – 1974

Matt Busby: Scotland

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x EUFA Champions League, 5 x Premier League titles.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 50%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Manchester United
  • Years Active: 1945 – 1971

What Do Assistant Coaches Do During an NBA Match?

We are here to take a glimpse at the wide variety of men in suits that sit on the bench and find out what they do during an NBA game. We will also take a look at the seating arrangements to understand who sits in the first and second row and the duties each of them has during an NBA match. There are tons of folks that sit on the bench, so without any further delays, let’s meet the men from the first and second row.

The First and Second Row

The front row primarily refers to the courtside bench. However, this hasn’t been an actual bench for a very long time now. The rules of the NBA stipulate that a head coach, athletic trainer, and a maximum of three assistant coaches are allowed on the courtside bench.

The second row is situated directly behind the first-row bench. It is usually occupied by a player development assistant and a fourth assistant. You will also find an assistant trainer, athletic performance staff members, an advance scout, a video coordinator, and even a security person for the team. If a superstar is playing on the court, you might also see his security in the second row too.

There are loads of people for every match. However, what do each of them do during a game? Each of their responsibilities will vary. The associate head coach or lead assistant coach usually sits between the head coach and athletic trainer. He can be seen as the consigliere for the head coach and is given loads of responsibility in terms of strategy, suggestions, and advice.

One of the coaches in the first row is responsible for a scouting report on the opponents for the evening. He would give suggestions and advice based on the advance report. In most cases, he would even provide defensive calls if he understands the play-calling signals of the opponent.

In every case, the full range of assistant coaches is tracking data. Some teams will allocate this to the assistants in the second row, but most organizations will follow this chart when it comes to assistant coaches and staff.

First row

  • Offensive actions/sets (points per possession, results, play calls, etc.)
  • Defensive non-contests/contests and missed coverages
  • Defensive efficiency (why, where, when, what, who, and how)
  • The athletic trainer is in charge of timeouts and fouls as well as the whiteboard for the head coach.

Second Row

  • Anecdotal observations and individual player notes
  • Defensive deflections
  • Play-by-play times that are needed by video staff for both in-game and halftime instruction.
  • Opposition offensive times and calls

All this phenomenal tracking of a match stretches back to the 1970s. As squads were adding coaching staff, it became more complicated when it came to tracking data. This allows the coaching staff to get their hands on immediate feedback and keeps each of the staff members focused on the smaller details of the game.

The Coaching Staff for American Football

Nearly all American football teams contain more than one coach in the organization, including conditioning and strength coaches. A typical football team in the NFL will have around 15 assistant coaches, while a college football team will have around nine full-time assistant coaches along with two graduate assistant coaches. To give you an idea of the standard coaching staff you’ll find in an NFL team, we decided to list them below:

  • Head Coach

This is the guy that will receive all the praise for winning and all the blame when his team losses. Most head coaches boast with at least 20 years of playing and coaching experience and are all over 40 years of age.

  • Offensive Coordinator

This is the man that is in charge of the team’s attacking players, usually calling the plays while working directly with the team’s quarterback. He is primarily responsible for developing or creating the offensive game plan and works closely with the head coach to ensure the plays are showcased before matchday.

  • Defensive Coordinator

This is the guy that is in charge of the team’s defensive players. He often decides on the defensive schemes to use in both practices and matches. Similar to the offensive coordinator, he will meet with most of the coaching staff and players to prepare everyone for the upcoming game from a defensive point of view.

  • Special Teams Coach

This is the coach that will supervise the punt return team, field goal protection team, kick return team, punters, kickers, and so on. He is usually responsible for coaching the youngsters on the team as well and the reserve and backup players.

  • Quarterback Coach

This is an assistant coach that will monitor the mental and physical aspects of a quarterback and their game. He will improve the quarterback’s throwing motion, pass-drop technique, and footwork, ensuring he doesn’t fall into bad physical or mental habits.

  • Offensive Line Coach

This coach has an excellent understanding when it comes to the running game of the team and works closely with t5he offensive linemen. This coach will work hand-in-hand with the offensive coordinator to discuss running plays as well as the weaknesses and strengths of the unit.

  • Defensive Line Coach

This coach works exclusively with the team’s defensive linemen. He will work on pass rushing, gap control, run stopping and various stunts that the defensive coordinator requires from the football players.

  • Linebacker Coach

This coach will work closely with the linebackers in the team and, depending on the style of defence used by the team, will rank just below the team’s defensive coordinator. He works on pass coverage drops, pass-rushing, and tackling.

  • Strength Coach

This coach specializes in conditioning and weight training. He ensures that each player is in shape and reliable throughout the entire season and will usually coordinate training programs during the offseason. This coach will also work closely with team doctors to monitor and prepare rehabilitation exercises when a player gets injured.