Football Coach

Best Paid Coaches in the World of Rugby

The 2019 Rugby World Cup is now only a memory. It was a tournament that delivered a significant share of the unexpected. Yet what has usually expected after such a competition is that often coaches to these teams move on to a new phase in their careers. Before they do, we want to see which of them topped the ranks of highest-paid coaches during the tournament.

  • John Mitchell – With a salary of £300 000 this defence coach to the English Roses is in fifth place. The 55-year-old rugby star was born in Taranaki in New Zealand and is a former player for the country too. Mitchell was a head coach to the All Blacks from 2001 – 2003. After spending time at various other teams in the role of head coach, he joined Eddie Jones in 2018 as defence coach to the English side.
  • Steve Hansen – Rated as the best coach in All Black history, Hansen came in fourth on the list of best-paid coaches at an impressive income of £400 000. This former policeman managed to deliver an immaculate success rate with force in black and set an impressive winning record. The rumours, however, seem to get louder that he will be leaving them soon.
  • Warren Gatland – £450 000 places Gatland in the third position. The Wales coach managed to get his team in the top four at the RWC after a great year of tremendous success. New Zealand born Gatland comes with a long and successful coaching career that stretches as far back as 1989 when he started his career at the Galwegians RFC. The 56-year-old rugby legend joined Wales in 2007, and since then they have won four Six Nations titles, this included three Grand Slams, and the team managed to reach the semi-finals in both the 2019 and 2011 RWC tournaments.
  • Joe Schmidt – Ireland’s Schmidt earns £600 000, and that made him a second position on the ranks of coaches who featured in Tokyo. He too is New Zealand born and has been coaching the Irish team since 2013. The team managed to achieve great success during this period with three Six Nations Championship behind their name, and they also maintained their first-ever victory over the All Blacks.
  • Eddie Jones – The coach to the English Roses stands at the top of the ranks with a desirable £750 000 salary. This places him quite a bit ahead of Schmidt and miles ahead of the rest on the list. The success of this Australian born coach earned him the recognition of World Rugby Coach of the Year in 2017. He joined England in 2015 and since then have taken them from strength to strength.
  • Pat Lam – Due to him not being one of the coaches in the RWC he can’t really be considered in this list, yet as Director of Rugby at the Bristol Bears, he served as head coach to the team during the Gallagher Premiership Rugby and hence this 51-year-old coach, originally from New Zealand, tops the list with £800 000.

Rassie Erasmus

This RWC is in the semi-finals phase. Thus far it has been an event filled with excitement, drama, surprise and a good deal of sadness and trauma after super typhoon Hagibis hit Japan amidst the tournament. The devastation left by this storm, equal in strength to a category five hurricane, was tremendous and many people were left homeless or injured with an unfortunate number of mortalities too. The Japanese people are a proud and resilient nation. Immediately after the storm, they started with clean-ups and rising from the devastation. Yet they aren’t the only ones showing strength and resilience during the tournament. A team that seems to be moving up in the ranks once again to former glory is none other than the South African Springboks. Under the guidance of head coach Rassie Erasmus, they have moved from strength to strength.

Rassie Erasmus

Johan Erasmus or better known as Rassie, is currently filling the position of the head coach to the national team since 2018. He is also now in the area of being the first-ever appointed South African Rugby Union Director of Rugby. He had been fulfilling this position since late in 2017. Previously Erasmus also served as the Director of Rugby for Munster in Ireland while also being the General Manager for High-performance Teams in South African Rugby Union. Erasmus represented South Africa on the field as an international player from 1997 to 2001. He started his playing career in 1994 when he was playing for the provincial team in South Africa, the Free State, during the Curry Cup that year.

His Leadership Qualities

The success which the team currently experiences is, however, due to his coaching capabilities. Players of the group refer to Erasmus as the one that broke the team’s mental shackles. Since Erasmus took over two years ago, the club underwent an entire transformation process. The players attribute this to the open and honest approach which Erasmus has with them. He is the man who took it upon himself to make decisions for the team, which influenced an entire country. He is not shying away from giving the players in the team his honest opinion about their capabilities and where they are still lacking. His team knows that he is following a leadership style of authenticity and clarity, and nothing is ever hidden away from them.

This cultivates mutual trust within the team and that way; he earned not only the respect of the group but of the entire country as a whole. Furthermore, Erasmus’s coaching style is being appreciated by his team for his ability to let everyone excel in their unique way. He doesn’t favour any player on any other determining factor other than the quality of their play hence they all know that they have earned their place in the team on merit and not on race, or anything else. These are the characteristics of a great coach, one that took it upon himself to transform a crippled team into greatness once again.

Mistakes Commonly Made by Coaches

Coaches are the people who offer leadership and guidance, the people who the team looks up to for answers and assistance, but they too are only human and hence make mistakes. Some mistakes are less severe than others, and some could be considered to be merely embarrassing, but others can have detrimental effects on coaches and teams over the long run. Let’s explore some mistakes which coaches commonly find themselves making.

Regardless of how passionate coaches are about their careers and their teams, the truth of the matter is that coaches are in a position where a lot is expected from them on both a physical as well as on mental and emotional levels. Hence they must find a balance between work and relaxation to recharge and be able to give.

Poor Systems

Having a system in which your work form is vital, but the system should fulfil the purpose of a structure and not dictate every single step taken. A coach can easily fall into the trap of getting immersed in a rigid and restrictive system which will limit his coaching opportunities and not be beneficial to the development of the team at all.

Improving unity within a team is vital and crucial for success during competition. Still, it is essential to remember that each of the members of the group is a person with individual needs and concerns as well, and the coach should not neglect these. A team is only as strong as its weakest member, and hence, it is vital to ensure that each team member can deliver their top performance.

Neglecting Voices

As much as a coach loves to share wisdom and skills, as necessary is it not to talk too much. Whenever a coach is going on talking too much or going into long team talks, it can result in players becoming shut down and not taking in what is being said at all. It is much more advisable to listen sometimes, leave moments for reflection and contemplation and emphasize the silence in between. State your message clearly and give the team time to process the message internally.

When help is needed, or something is required, which is not your field of expertise, it is advised that assistance is requested. Sometimes getting a team member involved in some other aspect of the team’s organization can improve their sense of belonging and show them that you value their contribution. This can have a positive effect on the field. Delegating some of your responsibilities to people who can take it off your hands, can free the coach up to attend to matters which is vital to the success of the team.

Robbie Fowler’s Coaching Career Kicks Off

Middle October sees the kick-off of the Australian A-League and the former Liverpool star is keen on making his mark as head coach to Brisbane Roar. This is the opportunity which Robbie Fowler has been waiting for. Up to now his experience as a coach has been limited to coaching for a short while in Thailand at the club Muangthong United. Otherwise, he has been employed at Liverpool’s academy, lacking any other coaching experience.

Fowler the Reliable Option

Even though many are aware of the lack of an extensive coaching career behind Fowler’s name, he is still considered to be a great option to bring the ailing Australian A-League team back to former glory. He does have an excellent knowledge of the league after spending some time at North Queensland Fury as well as at Perth Glory. Thus he used the words reliable and safe to describe himself once appointed to coach in the league. This might also prove to be more than mere words in the future of Brisbane Roar who already had seen some success as Fowler assisted them into some pre-season glory when they managed to grab the Surf City Cup from Perth Glory and the Newcastle Jets.

Their style of playing and especially their manner of the attack showed much promise for the upcoming season as well as their opening game against the runner-up team of last year, Perth. Fowler was very much impressed with the results when his team won the Cup and stated that even though they can still work on many small things, they have already sorted out most of the concerns. He also mentioned that the team has many good players, and they have the character needed to take them to success during the season.

The Previous Season

Last year, Brisbane Roar ended the season in ninth place. The only club behind them on the rankings was Central Coast Mariners, the basement club. The leader on the list was Sydney FC. Sydney will be opening their season against Adelaide. Adelaide is also under new management with Gertjan Verbeek, the very experienced Dutchman at their lead. Verbeek just moved on from FC Twente. Joining Verbeek and Fowler as the newbies in the league are Erick Mombaerts, the Frenchman at Melbourne City and Marco Kurtz, the German previously managing Adelaide and now in charge of Melbourne Victory.

While the two clubs from Melbourne will face each other, Western Sydney Wanderers and the Mariners and New Zealand’s Wellington Phoenix and Western United will also meet in the opening matches taking place soon. Western United was included this year as the 11th team when the A-League was expanded to add one more group. Another edition to achieve a total of 12 units, is scheduled for next year.

The Coaching Staff of the Liverpool Football Club

While the captain of the Liverpool ship is undoubtedly Jurgen Klopp, there are loads of other noteworthy helpers on the boat to sail the Reds to glory. With the recent Champions League victory, and finishing second in the Premier League, we decided to take a look at all the coaching staff at Jurgen Klopp’s disposal. He has managed to build a phenomenal team to ensure that the playing squad remains prepared and focused for the upcoming season that starts in August 2019.

Assistant Manager – Peter Krawietz

Peter Krawietz decided to follow Jurgen Klopp to Liverpool in October 2015 from Borussia Dortmund. He initially worked with the Liverpool manager back in Mainz when Jurgen was the head coach, while he was the chief scout. The German, who is not considered a professional footballer by any means, was dubbed “The Eye” due to his phenomenal video analysis and scouting abilities.

Assistant Manager – Pep Lijnders

Jurgen Klopp didn’t think twice when he had the opportunity to bring back Pep Lijnders to Liverpool in June 2018, where he briefly left the club to return to his homeland where he was in control of NEC Nijmegen. Lijnders previously spent more than three years with Liverpool, first as a coach for the under-16’s and then the first-team development coach during 2015. Since Klopp arrived, Lijnders managed to climb even further where he is now a vital part of the team as an assistant coach.

Goalkeeping Coach – John Achterberg

Achterberg is another Dutchman in the coaching staff for Liverpool that joined in June 2009 after he spent more than a decade with Tranmere Rovers. He was initially a player with the team before he moved to a coaching position. Achterberg received his promotion to goalkeeping coach in 2011 and has coached Liverpool’s goalkeepers ever since.

Head of Conditioning and Fitness – Andreas Kornmayer

Kornmayer decided to join The Reds in July 2016 after he spent more than 15 years with the dominant Bayern Munich team. Given Liverpool’s reliance on energy, tremendous importance is placed on the ability and skill of Kornmayer, who much impressed Klopp during his time spent at Bayern Munich where he worked under Pep Guardiola, Jupp Heynckes, and Louis van Gaal.

Head of Medical Services – Dr Andrew Massey

Dr Massey was initially a professional football player in an Irish League before an injury forced him to enrol in a university where he studied physiotherapy. After his studies in medicine and sports physiotherapy, Dr Massey joined the ice hockey team, Belfast Giants, before he was promoted as team doctor. In 2013, he was appointed the academy doctor for Liverpool and was made permanent in 2015.

Performance and Rehabilitation Manager – Philipp Jacobsen

The newest recruit in the Liverpool coaching staff is Philipp Jacobsen that works closely with Dr Massey. Jacobsen was initially a senior physiotherapist in Qatar before he made his way to the Liverpool squad. He also worked with the national team of Qatar, where he gained most of his experience.

The Best Managers of All Time in Football

A world-renowned football magazine has recently published a list of the best football managers in the history of the sport. The criteria’s that were used to compile this list included trophies won during their coaching careers as well as how the coach influenced the competition and other managers. Below, you will find a list of the best football managers to ever coach the sport.

Rinus Michels: Netherlands

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x EUFA European Championship, 1 x European Cup, 1 x La Liga Championship, 4 x Eredivisie Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Netherlands national team, FC Barcelona, Ajax
  • Years Active: 1960 – 1992

Sir Alex Ferguson

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 2 x European Cup Winners Cup, 13 x Premier Leagues, 3 x Scottish Division Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 58.1%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Manchester United
  • Years Active: 1974 – 2013

Arrigo Sacchi: Italy

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 1 x Serie A Championship
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Italy national soccer team, AC Milan
  • Years Active: 1985 – 2001

Johan Cruyff: Netherlands

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x UEFA Champions League, 4 x La Liga Championships
  • Win Percentage Overall: 61.3%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: FC Barcelona, Ajax
  • Years Active: 1985 – 2013

Pep Guardiola: Spain

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 2 x Premier Leagues, 3 x Bundesliga Championships, 3 x La Liga Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 72.5%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Manchester City, Bayern Munich, FC Barcelona
  • Years Active: 2008 – Present

Valeriy Lobanovskyi: Ukraine

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x EUFA Cup Winners Cups, 5 x Ukraine National League Championships, 8 x Soviet Top League Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Dynamo Kyiv
  • Years Active: 1969 – 2001

Helenio Herrera: France/Argentina

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x EUFA Champions Leagues, 2 x Serie A Championships, 4 x La Liga Championships.
  • Win Percentage Overall: Unknown
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Inter Milan, FC Barcelona, Atletico Madrid
  • Years Active: 1944 – 1981

Carlo Ancelotti: Italy

  • Major Titles Claimed: 3 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 1 x Bundesliga Championship, 1 x Ligue 1 Championship, 1 x Premier League, 1 x Serie A Championship
  • Win Percentage Overall: 59%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Bayern Munich, Real Madrid, Chelsea, AC Milan, Juventus
  • Years Active: 1995 – Present

Ernst Happel: Austria

  • Major Titles Claimed: 2 x UEFA Champions Leagues, 2 x Austrian Championships, 2 x Bundesliga Championships, 1 x Eredivisie Championship.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 55%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Hamburg, Netherlands national team, Club Brugge.
  • Years Active: 1962 – 1992

Bill Shankly: Scotland

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x EUFA Champions League, 2 x Premier League Titles.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 49.3%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Liverpool
  • Years Active: 1949 – 1974

Matt Busby: Scotland

  • Major Titles Claimed: 1 x EUFA Champions League, 5 x Premier League titles.
  • Win Percentage Overall: 50%
  • Elite Clubs Managed: Manchester United
  • Years Active: 1945 – 1971

The Coaching Staff for American Football

Nearly all American football teams contain more than one coach in the organization, including conditioning and strength coaches. A typical football team in the NFL will have around 15 assistant coaches, while a college football team will have around nine full-time assistant coaches along with two graduate assistant coaches. To give you an idea of the standard coaching staff you’ll find in an NFL team, we decided to list them below:

  • Head Coach

This is the guy that will receive all the praise for winning and all the blame when his team losses. Most head coaches boast with at least 20 years of playing and coaching experience and are all over 40 years of age.

  • Offensive Coordinator

This is the man that is in charge of the team’s attacking players, usually calling the plays while working directly with the team’s quarterback. He is primarily responsible for developing or creating the offensive game plan and works closely with the head coach to ensure the plays are showcased before matchday.

  • Defensive Coordinator

This is the guy that is in charge of the team’s defensive players. He often decides on the defensive schemes to use in both practices and matches. Similar to the offensive coordinator, he will meet with most of the coaching staff and players to prepare everyone for the upcoming game from a defensive point of view.

  • Special Teams Coach

This is the coach that will supervise the punt return team, field goal protection team, kick return team, punters, kickers, and so on. He is usually responsible for coaching the youngsters on the team as well and the reserve and backup players.

  • Quarterback Coach

This is an assistant coach that will monitor the mental and physical aspects of a quarterback and their game. He will improve the quarterback’s throwing motion, pass-drop technique, and footwork, ensuring he doesn’t fall into bad physical or mental habits.

  • Offensive Line Coach

This coach has an excellent understanding when it comes to the running game of the team and works closely with t5he offensive linemen. This coach will work hand-in-hand with the offensive coordinator to discuss running plays as well as the weaknesses and strengths of the unit.

  • Defensive Line Coach

This coach works exclusively with the team’s defensive linemen. He will work on pass rushing, gap control, run stopping and various stunts that the defensive coordinator requires from the football players.

  • Linebacker Coach

This coach will work closely with the linebackers in the team and, depending on the style of defence used by the team, will rank just below the team’s defensive coordinator. He works on pass coverage drops, pass-rushing, and tackling.

  • Strength Coach

This coach specializes in conditioning and weight training. He ensures that each player is in shape and reliable throughout the entire season and will usually coordinate training programs during the offseason. This coach will also work closely with team doctors to monitor and prepare rehabilitation exercises when a player gets injured.

Manchester City’s Coaching Staff

Pep Guardiola is going to take most of the credit when Manchester City takes its sixth league titles this year. However, there is more than one coach that guides the team to victory each season. It’s for this very reason that we decided to take a look at the other coaches that fall under the squad and to see what their roles contribute to the phenomenal success of the team in 2019.

Assistant Coach: Domenec Torrent

Domenic Torrent is undoubtedly the most trusted staff member for Pep Guardiola at the moment. This is because he has worked alongside the head coach for several years, including his managerial roles under Bayern Munich and Barcelona. He is someone that always sits next to Guardiola during a game and is one of four assistant coaches.

Performance Analysis Coach: Carles Planchart

Best known for his attention to detail, Carles Planchart, a Barcelona-native, has been on Pep Guardiola’s side since he started his coaching career in 2007 with the Barcelona B team. He analyses individual and collective tactical aspects to assist in making improvements on both the club and different players.

Fitness Coach: Lorenzo Buenaventura

Guardiola was joined by Buenaventura in 2008 during his time at Barcelona and decided the follow the head coach to Bayern Munich as well. He plays a vital role in assisting City to perform at their best, ensuring all players are always fit and healthy before the start of every match. He is also renowned for speeding up the process when an injured player needs to get back on the field for an important game.

Head of Player Support and Protocol: Manel Estiarte

Manel Estiarte is an Olympic Gold Medallist, representing Spain a total of 578 times with water polo while becoming the first player in the sport to represent Spain a total of 6 times at the Olympic Games. He initially started working for Pep at Bayern Munich and continues to provide a world of sports knowledge to the head coach of Manchester City.

Assistant Coach: Rodolfo Borrell

The first coach for Lionel Messi at Barcelona was Borrell. He also played vital roles in the development stages for both Andres Iniesta and Cesc Fabregas. He initially moved to England after being appointed Liverpool’s technical director. After that, he joined Manchester City’s academy in 2014 before moving to Pep’s team in 2016.

Head of Goalkeeping: Xabi Mancisidor

Xabi Mancisidor was a former goalkeeper for Mallorca, a Spanish football team before he decide3d to join Manchester City as their goalkeeping coach when Manuel Pellegrini still ran the club. Therefore, he was made the head of goalkeeping by Guardiola when he arrived in 2016.

Assistant Coach: Mikel Arteta

Arteta is a former midfielder for both Arsenal and Everton and joined Guardiola in early 2016 when he decided to retire from playing football. He is considered the first member of Pep’s team and is regarded as one of the most critical assistants at Manchester City.

Ranking the Best Managers in the MLB

The MLB season is well underway, and head coaches across the league are devouring stat sheets and scouting reports, screaming for sacrifice bunts, watching pitch counts, and creating double switches to claim victories. The role of MLB managers is a significant one and its for this very reason that we decided to list the best MLB managers that are currently in the league.

Chicago Cubs – Joe Maddon

Joe Maddon utilises the out-of-the-box approach when it comes to his job and uses the talent he has in a very creative way to increase the overall performance of his team. This strategy has assisted him in transforming the Tampa Bay Rays from a devastating expansion franchise into a phenomenal contender within the American League. Since he joined the Chicago Cubs, he has assisted the team in winning more games than ever before, allowing him to claim the Manager of the Year award in the process.

San Francisco Giants – Bruce Bochy

Bruce Bochy is undoubtedly a Hall of Famer when he eventually decides to retire. He boasts with more World Series titles than any other baseball manager that is currently on the pitch, and he has also been with San Francisco for a little over a decade now. Before he decided to join the San Francisco Giants, this incredible manager managed to win 3 West titles in only 12 years. Bochy’s strategy has always been to do more with less even though he has loads of talent at his disposal.

Cleveland Indians – Terry Francona

When Francona was the manager of the Phillies between 1997 and 2000, he endured four losing seasons. However, he managed to earn a reputation as the best manager in baseball when it came to the Red Sox. During his first season with the Red Sox, he managed to break one of the most extended standing curses of the franchise when he led the team to the World Series since 1918. He also managed to lead Cleveland to their first playoff appearance and winning season in 6 years.

Baltimore Orioles – Buck Showalter

Showalter has managed to create success in every stop he has made as a manager, allowing him to earn the Manager of the Year award with three different MLB clubs while winning 100 games in 1999 with the Diamondbacks. During his time in Baltimore, he assisted the team in breaking a 14 season losing streak with an incredible 93-victory campaign during 2012 along with a postseason trip. The team hasn’t experienced a losing season since that occurred.

Pittsburgh Pirates – Clint Hurdle

Hurdle is considered an old-school baseball manager at heart and has changed more over the last couple of years than any other baseball manager. Since he joined the Pirates, he has allowed the team to make three successive trips to the playoffs. Hurdle is considered one of the top 5 managers due to his enormous success with Colorado and Pittsburgh combined with his strong presence at each of the clubs he has joined over the years.

Ranking the Top NHL Coaches in 2019

Fans and supporters of the NHL always seem to focus on the players, the wins, and which team reaches the playoffs. However, only a handful of them will look behind the scenes at the head coaches that lead each club. It’s for this reason that we decided to take a look at the current NHL head coaches and rank them from best to worst in the 2018/19 NHL season.

Chicago Blackhawks

Joel Quenneville undoubtedly runs away with the number 1 spot as he ranks second in all-time wins and boasts with 3 Stanley Cups in only 6 NHL seasons. Even though Chicago is pillaged annually by salary cap restrictions, Quenneville has managed to build a dynasty for himself and his team, impressing with several All-Stars in his squad.

Washington Capitals

The Washington Capitals have managed to transition from a one-dimensional threat to a powerhouse in the Eastern Conference thanks to the system implementation of Barry Trotz. The Capitals provide a phenomenally deep line-up in every game, and the priorities that are currently in place by the Jack Adams winner has managed to pay dividends from the bottom to the top.

Tampa Bay Lightning

Through everything that the Tampa Bay Lightning team has endured over the years, Jon Cooper has managed to stay on course with two consecutive playoff runs. Although Steve Yzerman holds the keys, Jon Cooper does a fantastic job at running the bench.

Los Angeles Kings

There’s no denying that Darryl Sutter is considered a man of few words. However, with 2 Stanley Cups in the trophy cabinet since 2012, he doesn’t need to say much as that alone speaks volumes. Along with Dean Lombardi as General Manager, Sutter has managed to build a long-lasting contender when it comes to Southern California.

Toronto Maple Leafs

Even though the team of Mike Babcock finished in the last place, he still managed to make a significant impact on the overall system used by the Maple Leafs. His prestigious resume will undoubtedly get him into the Hall of Fame. However, grooming Auston Matthews and the Toronto Maple Leafs into NHL superstars is the current task at hand.

Dallas Stars

When Lindy Ruff gets 12 more victories under the belt, he will finally move into the fifth position on the all-time list. Also, with a Central Division title, the Dallas Stars have managed to become a severe threat in the West thanks to the 18-year veteran running the show. The Dallas Stars have the most potent offence in the NHL. However, finding the perfect way to extrapolate the ultimate performances will determine the fate of the Stars.

Nashville Predators

Peter Laviolette is a seasoned veteran when he is behind the bench as each of his teams are always extremely difficult on opponents. He has managed to bring the Predators to the playoffs during both seasons at Nashville, and thanks to P.K. Subban, the Predators are now considered a serious contender for the cup in Music City.